Difference between revisions of "Neon Museum of Philadelphia"

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*Business: [http://www.davidsonneon.com/davineon.htm Davidson Neon]
 
*Digital Collection: [http://www.davidsonneon.com/postcards.htm Postcards]
 
*Digital Collection: [http://www.davidsonneon.com/postcards.htm Postcards]
  
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Latest revision as of 14:12, 13 September 2019

davidsonneon.com/museum.htm

1950s Howard Johnson's Lamplighter, part of the collection of the Neon Museum of Philadelphia.

Len Davidson began collecting old neon signs in the mid-1970s and established the Neon Museum of Philadelphia in 1985. The Museum's mission is to preserve, restore and display classic neon signs for the public to enjoy. About 150+ neon pieces in the collection date to the 1950's and earlier.

There are several types of pieces in the collection:

  • Exterior metal and neon signs with painted faces, such as Levis.
  • Exterior metal and neon signs with porcelain faces, such as Lamplighter and Sherwin Williams.
  • Neon signs that were hung in windows or displayed in other business interior spaces.
  • Neon clocks.
  • Neon art pieces.
  • Painted plastic signs with back-lit neon interiors.
  • Folk art type neon constructions made by old-time tubebenders.
  • Non-neon painted wooden signs.

Note:  The above descriptive information came from the museum's home page.

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