Difference between revisions of "Ensemble Novo"

From Wikidelphia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
(category added)
(Page Needing Work marker deleted)
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
{{toplink|url=http://www.ensemblenovo.com/home/|name=ensemblenovo.com}}In the years since the release of its debut Blue Night in 2013, Philadelphia-based Ensemble Novo has refined a sound that's perfectly suited to its primary inspiration – music made in Brazil during the 1960s and early 70s.
+
{{toplink|url=http://www.ensemblenovo.com/home/|name=ensemblenovo.com}}In the years since the release of its debut Blue Night in 2013, Philadelphia-based '''Ensemble Novo''' has refined a sound that's perfectly suited to its primary inspiration – '''music made in Brazil during the 1960s and early 70s'''.
  
 
It's a sound built on contrasts – the crystalline clarity of the vibraphone crossed with the husky introspection of tenor saxophone, the warmth of nylon string guitar woven into the crisp pulse of samba percussion. As is true of so much from Brazil, this is music that encourages (and sometimes demands) dancing, but is equally suited to contemplative listening.
 
It's a sound built on contrasts – the crystalline clarity of the vibraphone crossed with the husky introspection of tenor saxophone, the warmth of nylon string guitar woven into the crisp pulse of samba percussion. As is true of so much from Brazil, this is music that encourages (and sometimes demands) dancing, but is equally suited to contemplative listening.
Line 12: Line 12:
 
[[Category:Does-Music]] [[Category:Does-Music-Brazilian]]
 
[[Category:Does-Music]] [[Category:Does-Music-Brazilian]]
 
[[Category:Is-Music_Ensemble]]
 
[[Category:Is-Music_Ensemble]]
 
{{W}}
 

Latest revision as of 10:28, 13 September 2019

ensemblenovo.com

In the years since the release of its debut Blue Night in 2013, Philadelphia-based Ensemble Novo has refined a sound that's perfectly suited to its primary inspiration – music made in Brazil during the 1960s and early 70s.

It's a sound built on contrasts – the crystalline clarity of the vibraphone crossed with the husky introspection of tenor saxophone, the warmth of nylon string guitar woven into the crisp pulse of samba percussion. As is true of so much from Brazil, this is music that encourages (and sometimes demands) dancing, but is equally suited to contemplative listening.

Note:  The above descriptive information came from the group's Bio page.

Info